Food Systems

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Why Rain Gardens?

 

The loss of the world’s fertile soil and biodiversity, along with the loss of indigenous seeds and knowledge, pose a mortal threat to our future survival. According to soil scientists, at current rates of soil destruction (i.e. decarbonization, erosion, desertification, chemical pollution), within 50 years we will not only suffer serious damage to public health due to a qualitatively degraded food supply characterized by diminished nutrition and loss of important trace minerals, but we will literally no longer have enough arable topsoil to feed ourselves. Without protecting and regenerating the soil on our 4 billion acres of cultivated farmland, 8 billion acres of pastureland, and 10 billion acres of forest land, it will be impossible to feed the world, keep global warming below 2 degrees Celsius, or halt the loss of biodiversity.

The key to regenerative agriculture is that it not only “does no harm” to the land but actually improves it, using technologies that regenerate and revitalize the soil and the environment. Regenerative agriculture leads to healthy soil, capable of producing high quality, nutrient dense food while simultaneously improving, rather than degrading land, and ultimately leading to productive farms and healthy communities and economies. It is a dynamic and holistic, incorporating permaculture and organic farming practices, including conservation tillage, cover crops, crop rotation, composting, mobile animal shelters and pasture cropping, to increase food production, farmers’ income and especially, topsoil.

Food Self-Reliance

Shifting the mix of crop and livestock production in Southwest BC would increase food self-reliance, even with population growth. Although it is possible to grow a wide range of crops in the bioregion, prioritizing the production of specific vegetables, fruits, and livestock over hay and pasture is necessary if goals of increasing food self-reliance are to be achieved. Ecological Footprint Changing dietary preferences could substantially reduce the ecological footprint of Southwest BC food need. Red meat has a very high ecolog-ical footprint compared to other food commodities. Substituting meat alternatives (legumes) for all meat products while maintaining egg and dairy consumption—a vegetarian diet—would reduce the ecological footprint of food consumption by 37% when compared with the 2050 BAU scenario’s conventional diet. Further, reallocating production activi-ties to optimize food self-reliance for a vegetarian diet would result in an ecological footprint 40% smaller than the 2050 BAU scenario. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Although increasing local food production would result in a correspond-ing increase in emissions from agriculture in the short term, it presents a long-term opportunity to reduce emissions through changes to diet (less meat) and to farming practices. Emissions from manure and fertilizer application to farm fields, for example, can be reduced by adopting best management practices for application rates and timing and manure storage methods.

Carbon Stocks Maintaining existing large forest stands, which currently store the greatest amount of carbon on agricultural land in Southwest BC, would keep this carbon out of the atmosphere. To the extent that some are cleared for food production, other measures to mitigate associated loss of stored carbon could be implemented. Examples of mitigation measures include: increasing soil organic matter, planting new hedgerows or riparian buffers, and maintaining existing perennial vegetation along parcel boundaries and waterways. Wildlife Habitat Capacity The most effective enhancements for habitat capacity would be to plant extensive perennial hedgerows along field boundaries and riparian buffers along waterways, protect high-value habitats such as wetlands, and cultivate perennial crops such as berries and nuts. However, the capacity for habitat on Southwest BC farmland would remain relatively poor regardless of habitat enhancements imple-mented. Improving capacity to a “moderate” level would likely pose a high trade-off with lowered food production and self-reliance. Habitat Connectivity Establishing hedgerows and riparian buffers would result in a more extensive network of wildlife habitat that facilitates ease and safety of movement, with minimal trade-offs for food production. Nutrient Surplus (N and P)Strategically increasing crop and animal production with an appropri-ate mix would maintain a balance between the amount of nutrients produced and required, thereby minimizing the risk of nutrient losses to the environment. Economic Impact (All) Increasing food production in accordance with local food need and increasing local food processing capacity would increase the eco-nomic contribution of Southwest BC’s food system to the provincial economy. The processing sector is key to stimulating the regional food system economy as it adds value to farm products and creates more links within the regional food supply chain.

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Carbon Stocks Maintaining existing large forest stands, which currently store the greatest amount of carbon on agricultural land in Southwest BC, would keep this carbon out of the atmosphere. To the extent that some are cleared for food production, other measures to mitigate associated loss of stored carbon could be implemented. Examples of mitigation measures include: increasing soil organic matter, planting new hedgerows or riparian buffers, and maintaining existing perennial vegetation along parcel boundaries and waterways. Wildlife Habitat Capacity The most effective enhancements for habitat capacity would be to plant extensive perennial hedgerows along field boundaries and riparian buffers along waterways, protect high-value habitats such as wetlands, and cultivate perennial crops such as berries and nuts. However, the capacity for habitat on Southwest BC farmland would remain relatively poor regardless of habitat enhancements imple-mented. Improving capacity to a “moderate” level would likely pose a high trade-off with lowered food production and self-reliance. Habitat Connectivity Establishing hedgerows and riparian buffers would result in a more extensive network of wildlife habitat that facilitates ease and safety of movement, with minimal trade-offs for food production. Nutrient Surplus (N and P)Strategically increasing crop and animal production with an appropri-ate mix would maintain a balance between the amount of nutrients produced and required, thereby minimizing the risk of nutrient losses to the environment. Economic Impact (All) Increasing food production in accordance with local food need and increasing local food processing capacity would increase the eco-nomic contribution of Southwest BC’s food system to the provincial economy. The processing sector is key to stimulating the regional food system economy as it adds value to farm products and creates more links within the regional food supply chain.

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Members RE Bonus New RE in hrs AV or Qu
50
24 000
50
400
100
100
22 800
50
380
100
150
21 600
50
360
100
200
20 400
50
340
100
250
19 200
50
320
100
300
18 000
50
300
100
350
16 800
50
280
100
400
15 600
50
260
100
450
14 400
50
240
100
500
13 200
50
220
100
Total RES
Members
RE Bonus
per Member
New
Members
RE in
Hours
R per
Hour
AV or
Qu
5024 00050400R 0.25100
10022 80050380R 0.26100
15021 60050360R 0.28100
20020 40050340R 0.29100
25019 20050320R 0.31100
30018 00050300R 0.33100
35016 80050280R 0.36100
40015 60050260R 0.38100
45014 40050240R 0.42100
50013 20050220R 0.45100
55012 00050200R 0.50100
60010 80050180R 0.56100
6509 60050160R 0.63100
7008 40050140R 0.71100
7507 20050120R 0.83100
8006 00050100R 1.00100
8504 8005080R 1.25100
9003 6005060R 1.67100
9502 4005040R 2.50100
1 0001 2005020R 5.00100
2 0006001 00010R 10.00100
>>>300 5R 20.00100
RO*Food Certified Grass Fed Meat

Our certified Farmers are dedicated to providing top chefs, artisanal butchers, and educated consumers with the finest, most flavourful poultry, beef, lamb, pork and game raised on small farms using humane, all-natural methods.

Every single animal is raised with one guiding imperative: that there is nothing added EVER — no pesticides, animal by-products, hormones, growth stimulators or antibiotics. This allows Farmers to produce healthy meats the way they were meant to taste.

Certified Farms use Regeneratively Optimised Farming methods, including complex cover crops, planned rotational grazing, and no chemicals or tillage, to produce flavourful, nutritious proteins, while protecting animal welfare and restoring health to the soil. A single spoonful of healthy soil contains more life than there are humans on Earth!

Grassfed beef, when produced using regenerative grazing practices, can have many benefits for human health, animal welfare and the environment. Regenerative grazing has been shown to increase forage productivity while increasing soil organic matter, soil fertility and water-holding capacity. In these systems, grasses act as natural barriers to erosion and manure is evenly distributed by animal movement. The risk of exceeding the land’s assimilative capacity is largely avoided.

Grass finishing increases the concentration of conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) by a factor of between two and three compared to grain finishing. Grassfed meat also contains higher levels of antioxidants, including vitamins E and A, as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase, enzymes that scavenge free radicals that cause oxidation and spoilage. Higher antioxidants are better for meat quality (retarding spoilage from lipid peroxidation) and beneficial to the consumer.

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AV allocated to project (transfer from ads 4 a cause) at no cost
Advertiser searches za.rescue.exchange for project with AV and buys AV by contacting and depositing ZAR into the NPOs bank account
AV are transferred to the advertiser by the NPO
Advertiser pays their ads 4 a cause bill with AV by paying AV into ads 4 a cause account
System Transfers bRE to ads 4 a cause transfers bRE to Business

Advertiser registers as an approved advertiser and selects a listing manager
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“We really are in uncharted territory. We have a monster mash-up of the Great Depression in size, the crash of 1987 in speed, and the 9-11 attack in terms of fear.”-Liz Ann Sonders, chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab

Three hundred trout are needed to support one man for a year.
The trout, in turn, must consume 90,000 frogs, that must consume 27 million grasshoppers that live off of 1,000 tons of grass.
— G. Tyler Miller, Jr., American Chemist (1971)

There are approximately 4.5 years of human labor in a barrel of oil (N. J. Hagens, personal communication and The Oil Drum). No other energy source comes close to that level of energy density.

No matter how cleaver we are /// nothing will help us. The blame game … Lesotho is a good example… even the clonisers are colonised …

Systematic approach to incrementaliy make the changes neeeded /// Imperial decree in Japan to fix /// small steps make a big different esp if we use power of regeneration. ///

 

A change of focus from GDP to GNH (Gross National Happiness) is essential to ensure a equitable transition to a sustainable world.

Gross National Happiness

Gross National Happiness is a philosophy that guides the government of Bhutan. It includes an index which is used to measure the collective happiness and well-being of a population. Gross National Happiness is instituted as the goal of the government of Bhutan in the Constitution of Bhutan, enacted on 18 July 2008.

In 2011, The UN General Assembly passed Resolution “Happiness: towards a holistic approach to development” urging member nations to follow the example of Bhutan and measure happiness and well-being and calling happiness a “fundamental human goal.”

GNH is distinguishable from Gross Domestic Product by valuing collective happiness as the goal of governance, by emphasizing harmony with nature and traditional values as expressed in the 9 domains of happiness and 4 pillars of GNH.

The four pillars of GNH are 1) sustainable and equitable socio-economic development; 2) environmental conservation; 3) preservation and promotion of culture; and 4) good governance.

The nine domains of GNH are psychological well-being, health, time use, education, cultural diversity and resilience, good governance, community vitality, ecological diversity and resilience, and living standards.

This ethos is evident in ‘what’ the Rescue Earth System is!